God’s Grace: The Day Time Stopped

“When you really look for me, you will see me instantly –you will find me in the tiniest house of time. Kabir says: Student, tell me, what is God? He is the breath inside the breath.” – Kabir cappadocia-region by MargeBotten via NatGeo This week’s prompt gave me much food for thought…   If you could stop time for 24 hours, what would you accomplish? A Meditation Heaven is long-enduring and earth continues long. The reason why heaven and earth are able to endure and continue thus ...

Haiku: Silence…

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Reflections: Sitting in Silence…

“See how nature – trees, flowers, grass – grows in silence; see the stars, the moon and the sun, how they move in silence…we need silence to be able to touch souls.” Mother Teresa of Calcutta Reflections: Sitting in Silence... Silence and thanksgiving in a chapel... Ten Things That Lead Me to Silence… There are times when we choose to be silent, during meditation/prayer, and times when we are stunned into silence by events that take our breath away; that leave us speechless. ...

Life Without Limits-Inspiration for a Ridiculously Good Life… A Review

“Living without limits means knowing that you always have something to give, something that might ease the burden of others.” Nick Vujicic Life Without Limits... Nick Vujicic What limits do we place on our lives? How can we live a life without limits; a purposeful life? Recently, I read a book that was so compelling, I couldn’t put it down. It was the personal journey of Nick Vujicic, a motivational speaker and inspiring author of “Life Without Limits-Inspiration for a Ridiculously Good Life,” ...

Tips on Growing African Violets

African Violet (Saintpaula) is one of the most popular flowering houseplants, as it is small and compact, easy to grow, and blooms frequently! It’s the prefect plant for beginners! African violets come in purple, blue, lavender, red, white, pink and bi-colours. And best of all, you can grow more plants with a single leaf! They are available all year round at local garden centers and florists. The key to growing African violets is to pay attention to light, water, temperature and ...

Tips on Growing Dahlias

Dahlias are a must for any garden, especially cutting gardens. They come in a wide variety spectacular colours, shapes and sizes! Their big, beautiful blooms will add a burst of bright colour and beauty to the summer garden. Dahlias are easily one of the most popular flowers in the garden, as they are beautiful, easy to grow and readily available. Here are some tips to growing dahlias: They do best in climate zones 7-11. These summer blooming tubers are generally planted in the ...

Tight Asses

Mrs. Chatterbox and I just returned from four days of rare sunshine on the Oregon Coast. We had a great time. On the drive back to Portland I was reminded of this incident from my childhood after spotting two pairs of jeans flapping on a clothesline. The Holloway twins lived across the street from the house where I grew up in the 50s and 60s. Janice and Janet Holloway were blond, sported bouncy ponytails and were high school cheerleaders. Ricky Delgado, ...

Creating a Cutting Garden

As many gardeners will tell you, picking fresh flowers from the garden to create beautiful arrangements for the home or for friends and family is one of the many joys of gardening. Unfortunately, when the flowers are cut and removed, the garden will look bare and unattractive. So what are gardeners to do? The solution is to creating a designated “cutting garden,” where the flowers are grown with the intention of being cut. Since the flowers are meant to be cut ...

9 Bullying Myths That Parents Need to Know

Physical Bullying My family moved around a lot when I was growing up. Every two years or so, I had to attend a different school and since I was the "new kid" at each school I invariably experienced bullying in some manner - mostly it was shoving, destruction of my personal belongings and fights. It seems that I was not alone in my experience. According to the most recent government statistics 44 percent of middle schools reported bullying problems, while just over 20 percent ...

Has iPad Finally Jumped the Shark?

Fonzie “Jumps the Shark” – Wikipedia During the late 1970s and early 80s the most popular show on television was ABC’s “Happy Days.” The Cunninghams and Arthur “Fonzie” Fonzarelli were members of the family – until Fonzie jumped the shark – literally. The phrase “jump the shark” relates to the episode during the series’ twilight when the cast went to Hawaii and the daredevil Fonzie had to water-ski jump over a shark tank for some contrived sense of honor. After that point, critics and ...

12 Marathons in 12 Months for Wounded Soliders

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When Your Child has Cancer…

Our sweet Sarah was just six when she was diagnosed with Stage IV Neuroblastoma.  Our family’s world was shaken.  Our foundations were rocked.  Our grief was incalculable. Life and Death in a Song One day shortly after Sarah’s diagnosis, I was running some errands and listening to the radio when a song called Untitled Hymn started playing. It beautifully described all the different chapters we go through in life and finished up with a verse about the end of life. It closed with ...

Finding Friends in a Hostile World

Over my lifetime I’ve had a series of friendships. As a young girl my two sisters were my best friends. We lived much like a happy litter of kittens, playing, eating, and sleeping together. We were exclusive and faithful to one another, keeping secrets, exploring the boundaries of obedience, and defending each other against neighborhood bullies. As time progressed, so did our worlds, causing us to step outside of our intimate family circle in search of new friends with similar interests. ...

Just Another Puzzle

I enjoy puzzles. Crossword puzzles, jigsaw puzzles, number puzzles, word puzzles like the one at the end of this posting. As a kid I loved a game now sold as Tangoes or Tangrams. It may have been called one of those when I was a kid, too. In the game, you figure out what combination of geometric shapes will form each overall silhouette depicted in the pamphlet. Writing a novel, I have come to understand, is yet another puzzle to play ...

Life Personified

A friend recently commented on my habit of personifying things. At first I wasn’t sure what he meant so I looked it up on dictionary.com: “per·son·i·fi·ca·tio [per-son-uh-fi-key-shuh n] noun, the attribution of a personal nature or character to inanimate objects or abstract notions.” He was right. I’ve been doing a lot of that lately. I think I do it because life has become so big and scary that humanizing things brings life down to my level. Living in a world where, amongst ...

Angry Birds: 10 Games That Didn't Make the Cut

Blockbuster game "Angry Birds" I don't understand the game Angry Birds. I've never played it but virtually everybody I know does - I don't get it. At its core, the game pelts suicidal birds at shoddily constructed buildings in the hopes that the structures will collapse on and kill green pigs that are inside. Could you imagine the public outcry if any part of that scenario was actually true? As inhumanly cruel as it sounds, that's the premise that was approved, designed and ...

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B Psycho
March 7, 2011, 3:47 pm

When the whistle is too big

Radley Balko recently noted the big fat Does-Not-Compute of Bradley Manning’s treatment while being held under non-violent charges (which the movement built up to support him is arguing shouldn’t be considered a crime at all), when compared to that of serial killers.  The problem there is obvious, and Balko is completely correct to point it out.  But then he says this:

I don’t think Manning is the hero some have made him out to be. If he had leaked information to blow the whistle on some specific government wrongdoing, I’d be right there with the people celebrating him. But this seems more like a vindictive, reckless act undertaken by a guy who by all appearances had a grudge to bear—not to mention some likely psychiatric problems. He did break the law, and because what he did was more of a petulant information dump than genuine whistle-blowing, I’m fine with him being prosecuted for the laws he broke.

This sounds like an awkward semantics argument to make.

A key component of the information Manning is being accused of leaking is the video of U.S. military helicopter pilots firing on & killing civilians, including employees of Reuters, in Iraq.  The Pentagon saw nothing wrong with that incident.  Unfortunately, the usual definition of whistle-blowing we work with assumes consequences — so’n’so has evidence that something happened that would undermine the business or institution they are part of, passes it on, and the perpetrators get punished.  The information in this case, instead, exposed wrongdoing built into the institution, which is what was revealed by the barely qualifying as a shrug reaction to the depicted incident.  How do you do the standard, accepted whistle-blower scenario when the damaging conduct is institutionally approved?

Obviously once the leak was linked with Manning he was going to be arrested.  No one seriously expected the U.S. government to stand aside in the face of such a revelation about the standard operating procedures of the U.S. military — hell, to be honest with you, I’m somewhat surprised they’ve shown the restraint to not just kill him.  The real issue boils down to this:

States attach legitimacy to their actions by invoking “the people”.  What does it say about them when “the people” knowing what they just did in our names is considered so much more offensive than what they just did?

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